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London for Ceremonial
The Queen's Birthday Parade 2022

The Queen's Birthday Parade 2022

On Parade

 

The Royal Procession

Brigade Major Household Division, Lieutenant Colonel J E N B Shaw, Grenadier Guards

Four Troopers of The Life Guards

The Mounted Band of the Household Cavalry

First and Second Divisions of the Sovereign’s Escort

Her Majesty The Queen

His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, Colonel Welsh Guards

His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge, Colonel Irish Guards

Her Royal Highness Princess Royal, Colonel The Blues and Royals, Gold Stick in Waiting

Field Officer of the Escort, Major R E Bond, The Life Guards

Escort Commander, Captain E A Martin, The Life Guards

Standard Coverer, Standard Bearer, Trumpeter

Master of the Horse, The Lord de Mauley

Crown Equerry Colonel W T Browne

Extra Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel S O N Segrave

Two Grooms, The Royal Household

Colonel The Life Guards, Lieutenant-General Sir E Smyth-Osbourne

Regimental Lieutenant Colonel Grenadier Guards Lieutenant General C R V Walker

Colonel Coldstream Guards Lieutenant General Sir J Bucknall

Major General Commanding the Household Division and General Officer Commanding London District, Major General C J Ghika CBE

Silver Stick in Waiting, Colonel C A Lockhart, Chief of Staff London District

Colonel J D Bagshaw Commanding Officer Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment

Lieutenant Colonel T J Armitage, The Life Guards

Aide-de-Camp, Captain J P Roy, Irish Guards

Lieutenant Colonel J L J Levine, Grenadier Guards

Lieutenant Colonel R R D Griffin, The Life Guards

Major J P W Gatehouse, Grenadier Guards

Colonel D D S A Vandeleur, Coldstream Guards

Major J R Kelly, Scots Guards

Major N J Hall, Irish Guards

Captain E W D Andersen, Welsh Guards

Two Grooms, The Royal Household

Staff Captain Household Division, Captain F G E H Howard-Keyes, The Life Guards

Four Troopers of The Blues and Royals

Third and Fourth Divisions of the Sovereign’s Escort

 


 

On Parade: Officers, Warrant Officers and Colour Sergeants

 

Field Officer in Brigade Waiting

Lieutenant Colonel J W Aldridge, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

Major of the Parade

Major A J Havelock, 1st Battalion Scots Guards

 

Adjutant of the Parade

Captain D J C Stodel, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

The Sovereign’s Escort, Household Cavalry

Field Officer of the Escort: Major R E Bond, The Life Guards
Escort Commander: Captain E A Martin, The Life Guards
Serrefile Captain: Captain J N D Bruce-Crampton, The Blues and Royals

 

Commanders of Divisions

No 1, Lieutenant F S Petit, The Life Guards
No 2, Captain T S Muir, The Life Guards
No 3, Captain G S Lane Fox, The Blues and Royals
No 4, Captain H W F Sayer, The Blues and Royals
Standard Bearer, Warrant Officer Class 2 (SCM) C Liburd, The Life Guards

 

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery

Commanding Officer, Major F L Sykes, Royal Horse Artillery Adjutant,
Captain M D O’Dell, Royal Horse Artillery Right Section Commander,
Captain F J Petterson, Royal Horse Artillery Centre Section Commander,
Captain T G Chinnery, Royal Horse Artillery Left Section Commander,
Captain J D Brooks, Royal Horse Artillery Warrant Officer Class 1 (RSM) I Ritchie Warrant Officer Class 2 (EI) L Allen

 

No 1 Guard (Escort for the Colour) - 1st Battalion Irish Guards

Major C A Allman-Brown
Captain F G A Bradshaw Lieutenant C A J Bashall
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) G McCurry
Colour Sergeant (CQMS) A Owens

 

No 2 Guard - 1st Battalion Irish Guards

Major B J Figgures-Wilson
Captain J M D O’Riordan
2nd Lieutenant A J Taylor
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) W Sampat
Colour Sergeant (CQMS) B Forster

 

No 3 Guard - 1st Battalion Irish Guards

Major R J M Watkins
Captain R J Howells
2nd Lieutenant C E Meadows
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) D Mckenzie
Colour Sergeant (CQMS) S Reeves

 

No 4 Guard - Nijmegen Company Grenadier Guards

Major R E Thompson
Lieutenant S J Fisher
Lieutenant T J Hodson
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) G Mann
Colour Sergeant (CQMS) M Mooney

 

No 5 Guard - F Company Scots Guards

Major S J S Wesley
Captain H N A McCorquodale
Lieutenant D S Beard
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) G Campbell
Colour Sergeant (CQMS) D Raisbeck

 

No 6 Guard - Number 7 Company Coldstream Guards

Major G O L Cazalet
Lieutenant C E T Brown
2nd Lieutenant J D J Savill
Warrant Officer Class 2 (CSM) A Fleming
Colour Sergeant L Hodgson

 

Regimental Sergeant Major

Warrant Officer Class 1 (RSM) D Griffiths, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

Senior Non-Commissioned Officer, Escort Party

Colour Sergeant J Smillie, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

In Command of Troops Lining The Mall

Commanding Officer: Lieutenant Colonel Viscount Marsham, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards
Adjutant: Captain W J C Bird, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards
Regimental Sergeant Major: Warrant Officer Class 1 R Dacey, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards

 

Directors of Music

Commanding Officer Lieutenant Colonel S N Haw MBE, Coldstream Guards
Major P A Collis-Smith, Band of the Household Cavalry
Captain B S Mason, Grenadier Guards
Major S J Halliday, Coldstream Guards
Major A Williams, Scots Guards
Captain N Skipper, Irish Guards
Major L Petritz-Watts, Welsh Guards

 

Garrison Sergeant Major London District

Warrant Officer Class 1 A J Stokes, Coldstream Guards

 

Band Regimental Sergeant Major

Warrant Officer Class 1 D Wright, Coldstream Guards

 

Drum and Pipe Majors

Senior Drum Major G Chambers, Irish Guards
Drum Major S Fitzgerald, Coldstream Guards
Drum Major D Fairley, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards
Drum Major S Carson, 1st Battalion Irish Guards
Drum Major S Laing, Welsh Guards
Pipe Major A Thomson, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

 


 

The Ceremony

 

Foot Guards

Escort for the Colour: 1st Battalion Irish Guards
No. 2 Guard: 1st Battalion Irish Guards
No. 3 Guard: 1st Battalion Irish Guards
No. 4 Guard: Nijmegen Company Grenadier Guards
No. 5 Guard: F Company Scots Guards
No. 6 Guard: No 7 Company Coldstream Guards

 

Massed Bands of the Household Division

Bands of all five Foot Guards Regiments
Drums and Pipes, 1st Battalion Irish Guards

 

The Sovereign’s Escort of the Household Cavalry

The Life Guards (61horses)
The Blues and Royals (57 horses)
The Mounted Band of the Household Cavalry - 51 musicians and 51 horses

 

The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery

57 mounted troop
75 horses pulling 6 guns

 

Street liners

1st Battalion Coldstream Guards line the Processional Route from Buckingham Palace to Horse Guards

 

 


 

The sequence of Events on Horse Guards

 

1. March On

  • Before The Queen’s Birthday Parade starts, a number of Colour Sergeants and Sergeants will take the position as Colour Points to guide the troops. The six Guards arrive and form up, accompanied by the Massed Bands and followed by the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery.
  • The Irish Guards Regimental Mascot, Turlough Mor, an Irish Wolfhound, will accompany them. Larry, the Number 10 Downing Street cat, has been advised to stay indoors at this point for his safety.
  • The Colour Party of 3 men, hand-picked for the role, marches to the centre of Horse Guards Parade and takes post in front of No. 6 Guard.
  • The Duty Drummer then marches out and uncases the Colour, ready for it to be trooped.
  • The Adjutant of the Parade hands over command to the Field
  • Officer in Brigade Waiting (Commanding Officer 1st Battalion Irish Guards) and the Officers fall in.
  • After a pause, the No. 3 Guard will open outwards from the centre to prepare for the arrival of the carriages conveying Members of the Royal Family.
  • As Members of the Royal Family arrive, the Guards present arms, The King’s Troop carries swords and the Massed Bands play six bars of the National Anthem as a Royal Salute.
  • The audience should stand. Salute (if in uniform), gentlemen remove their hats and ladies may curtsey. When standing up, please avoid letting your seat hit the back of the stand as it can unsettle the horses.
  • The carriages enter Horse Guards arch, where the occupants alight to watch from the Major General’s office (once used by the Duke of Wellington).
  • The audience should sit.

2. Arrival of the Sovereign

  • Her Majesty The Queen rides down the Mall in the Ascot Landau (if the weather is inclement Her Majesty the Queen will ride in the Scottish State Coach). The carriage will be drawn by a pair of matching grey horses.
  • The Sovereign’s Escort, found by troops of the Household Cavalry and the Mounted Band, protect Her Majesty. Two Divisions travel ahead of Her Majesty and two behind.
  • The Royal Procession, led by the Brigade Major, Household Division, also includes the Royal Colonels:
  • His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales (Colonel Welsh Guards)
  • His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge (Colonel Irish Guards)
  • Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal (Colonel The Blues and Royals)
  • The audience should stand. Salute (if in uniform), gentlemen remove their hats and ladies may curtsey.
  • Lt Gen Sir James Bucknall (Colonel Coldstream Guards) The Major General and Chief of Staff and Aide-de-Camp Silver Stick-in-Waiting and the Regimental Adjutants
  • As Her Majesty arrives, the Royal Salute is given, the National Anthem is played, and the Royal Standard is released and flown from the roof of Horse Guards.
  • The audience should remain standing until after the National Anthem.
  • The Royal Carriage arrives at Horse Guards Parade at 11am.
  • The audience should stand as Her Majesty passes their stand and sit down again afterwards.

3. Inspection of the Line

  • Her Majesty the Queen is driven along the line of Guards to conduct her inspection of the Foot Guards, who along with the Household Cavalry, form the Household Division.
  • Every Guardsman on parade is an operational soldier and the standards they apply to ceremonial duties are reflected in the excellence with which they conduct operations.
  • With more experience of this event than any other person present, Her Majesty will notice any detail that is not correct and will inform the Major General afterwards.
  • Members of the audience should stand as Her Majesty passes. Salute (if in uniform), gentlemen remove their hats and ladies may curtsey. Please remain standing until Her Majesty and all the Royal Colonels have passed.
  • Once Her Majesty The Queen has returned to the dais, the command ‘Troop’ is given by the Field Officer in Brigade Waiting in command of the parade.

4. Massed Bands Troop

  • The Massed Bands and Drums march across Horse Guards Parade in slow and quick time. The slow march is traditionally Giacomo Meyerbeer’s opera ‘Les Huguenots’.
  • The Massed Bands, Corps of Drums and Drums and Pipes then reposition so the Escort (No. 1 Guard) has room to march forward.
  • The lone drummer peels off and takes up a position two paces to the right of the Escort. Drummers form the Machine Gun Platoon in training and on operations.

5. Collection of the Colour to be trooped by the Escort (No. 1 Guard)

  • The lone drummer plays 8 bars of a field signal called the Drummer’s Call, prompting the Captain of the Escort to transfer command of the Escort to the Subaltern.
  • The Escort is moved into close order, ready to march forward to collect the Colour. The Regimental Sergeant Major is positioned at the rear of the Escort.
  • The Regimental Sergeant Major gives his pace stick to his orderly and he draws his sword; one of few occasions when a Warrant Officer does so on parade.
  • The Subaltern, followed by the Ensign (the junior officer tasked to carry the Colour), leads No. 1 Guard forward in quick time towards the Colour Party.
  • The tune of ‘The British Grenadiers’ is played regardless of which Regiment is trooping its Colour as all infantry
  • Battalions once included a grenadier company.
  • The grenadier company were made up of the tallest men on the right of the line, tactically the most important position on the battlefield.
  • The Escort (No 1 Guard) halts in front of the Colour Party. The Regimental Sergeant Major passes the Colour to the Ensign who places it in the white colour belt.
  • The ‘Escort for the Colour’ now becomes the ‘Escort to the Colour’. No compliments and please remain seated.
  • The Escort to the Colour presents arms and the Massed Bands play the National Anthem.
  • The 4 non-commissioned officers at the corners of the Escort turn outwards and ‘port arms’ to protect the Colour and Escort during this salute.
  • The Regimental Sergeant Major and others return to their positions and with the Ensign and Colour to the front, the Escort slow marches towards No. 6 Guard.
  • The Massed Bands perform the spin-wheel to enable them to turn smartly and efficiently in a limited amount of space.
  • It is not written down in any drill manual but is passed down from one generation of musicians to the next by word of mouth.

6. Trooping the Colour through the Ranks

  • The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting orders the entire parade to ‘Present Arms’ in order to pay appropriate compliments to the Colour.
  • The Escort to the Colour troops the Colour along the ranks of the other Guards, starting at No. 6 Guard and finishing at their position at the right of the line.
  • Members of the audience should stand as The Queen’s Colour passes their position. Salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats. Individuals should sit again as soon as the Colour has passed them.
  • Once the Escort has returned, the Captain resumes command. The Parade is ordered to slope arms and this completes the Trooping phase.

7. March Past by the Foot Guards

  • The Guards form Divisions and the long unbroken lines of Guardsmen are transformed into a number of evenly spaced company formations, ready to manoeuvre.
  • The Guards march round Horse Guards Parade in slow time. Straight lines and the correct column distance takes much practice to achieve.
  • Members of the audience stand as the Colour approaches. Salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats. Sit once the Escort to the Colour has passes.
  • As the Escort and each Guard pass Her Majesty, the music changes to the slow march of each Regiment. Officers salute with their swords and other ranks give a sharp ‘Eyes Right’.
  • The Ensign carrying the Colour salutes by lowering it to a horizontal position, completely unfurled, with the Regiment’s insignia and battle honours fully visible.
  • Her Majesty acknowledges the Colour as it passes, while the Royal Colonels and other senior officers salute.
  • Once every Guard has passed Her Majesty in slow time, they break into quick time.
  • As the Guards left form in quick time, they change arms, moving rifles from the left to the right shoulder to rest the muscles.
  • Once again, the Guards march past Her Majesty and this time to their respective Regimental quick march. The Ensign carrying the Colour remains at the rear right-hand side of the Escort.
  • Members of the audience stand as The Queen’s Colour passes their position. Salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats. Individuals should sit again as soon as the Colour has passed.
  • The Massed Bands withdraw to allow the Band of the Household Cavalry to come forward for the ride past.

8. Ride Past

  • The King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery, The Life Guards and The Blues and Royals, accompanied by the Mounted Band of the Household Cavalry, ride past.
  • The King’s Troop leads the divisions because the guns of the Royal Horse Artillery take precedence over all other units when on parade.
  • The Sovereign’s Standard is dipped to Her Majesty at the walk past by the Standard Bearer.
  • Please stand as the first gun approaches, then as the Sovereign’s Standard and Escort passes. Salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats for the first gun and the Sovereign’s Standard only
  • For mounted troops, marching past is conducted at the walk and the sitting trot. Changes of direction by the cavalry are given by ‘cutting’, a flashing sword movement, not by voice.
  • The music played for the sitting trot is the tune of ‘The Keel Row’. The horses know this tune and will prick up their ears as soon as the first few bars are played.
  • Note that soldiers in The King’s Troop all have operational roles in the Royal Artillery, either with guns in the indirect fire role or operating Unmanned Aerial Systems.
  • Household Cavalry soldiers are all trained to operate in the armoured cavalry role, currently with the CVR(T) vehicle and soon to be equipped with the new Ajax vehicle.

9. March off

  • After the Household Cavalry rides past, the National Anthem is played as Her Majesty The Queen receives the final salute.
  • The audience is to stand. Salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats. As the Guards slope arms after the Royal Salute, all may sit.
  • The Field Officer in Brigade Waiting informs Her Majesty that Her Guards are ready to march off. Her Majesty gives permission and the Field Officer withdraws.
  • The Guards form divisions as the mounted troops leave the Parade. Led by the Mounted Band, they start to make their way towards The Mall.
  • Her Majesty mounts the carriage and, flanked by the Royal Colonels, moves to the head of Her Guards for the procession down The Mall to Buckingham Palace.
  • The audience is to stand. As Her Majesty passes their position salute (if in uniform) gentlemen remove their hats and ladies may curtsey.
  • Preceded by the Household Cavalry, the Massed Bands lead the Royal Procession along The Mall. The street liners give a Royal Salute as Her Majesty passes.
  • Once Her Majesty and the Guards have departed Horse Guards Parade, the Colour Points march off, signifying the end of The Queen’s Birthday Parade.
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