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London for Ceremonial
Trooping the Colour

Trooping the Colour

Trooping the Colour


 The word ‘Colour’ refers to the regimental flags of the British Infantry. Flags have been used as rallying points for military units since the time of the Kings of Babylon. In 1707, during Queen Anne’s reign, the number of Colours was reduced to two per regiment. Colours were last carried into action by the 58th Foot in South Africa in 1881. Up until that time they witnessed all the varying fortunes of their Regiment and were often torn by enemy fire, acquiring an almost religious significance.

The Colours are still highly regarded today and are always carried by an officer and accompanied by an armed escort. The Welsh Guards have 47 Battle Honours, of which 21 are displayed on The Colours. Battle Honours are awarded by the Sovereign in recognition of a particular Regiment’s involvement or contribution to a battle.The Regiment’s first Battle Honour was awarded for its notable participation in the Battle of Loos in 1915 and its most recent Battle Honour was awarded for the action the Regiment saw in the Falklands in 1982.

The Queen’s Colour on parade today was presented to 1st Battalion Welsh Guards by Her Majesty The Queen at Windsor Castle on 30 April 2015, which was also the Regiment’s Centenary year.

 

 

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